//cdncn.goodao.net/haitianamino/45cacdf5.jpg

EAA

EAA

Short Description:

Product: EAA

CAS No.:

Standard: In-House

Function and application:Functional foods.Nutritious supplementary.

1. Promote muscle growth and reduce muscle loss

2.Improve physical performance and reduce fatigue under tension.

3. Improve the immune function.

packing25kg/bagdrum),other pack according orders

MOQ: 25kg

Shelf life: 2 years


Product Detail

Product Tags

Technical parameters: 

EAA

In-House

Description

White crystals or crystalline powder

L-Leucine

33.30%

L-Valine

14.70%

L-Lysine

14.70%

L-Phenylalanine

12.00%

L-Threonine

10.00%

L-Isoleucine

6.00%

L-Histidine

4.70%

L-Methionine

3.30%

L-Tryptophan

1.30%

Lecithin

0.5-1.0%

Heavy metals

<10ppm

Arsenic(As)

<1ppm

Lead(Pb)

<3ppm

Cadmium(Cd)

<1ppm

Mercury(Hg)

<0.1ppm

Amino acids are organic compounds composed of nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, along with a variable side chain group.

Your body needs 20 different amino acids to grow and function properly. Though all 20 of these are important for your health, only nine amino acids are classified as essential.

These are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine.

Unlike nonessential amino acids, essential amino acids can’t be made by your body and must be obtained through your diet.

The best sources of essential amino acids are animal proteins like meat, eggs and poultry.

Conditionally Essential Amino Acids

There are several nonessential amino acids that are classified as conditionally essential.

These are considered to be essential only under specific circumstances such as illness or stress.

SUMMARY

The nine essential amino acids can’t be produced by your body and must be obtained through your diet. Conditionally essential amino acids are only essential under special circumstances like illness.

Their Roles in Your Body

The nine essential amino acids perform a number of important and varied jobs in your body:

Phenylalanine: Phenylalanine is a precursor for the neurotransmitters tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. It plays an integral role in the structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the production of other amino acids (4).

Valine: Valine is one of three branched-chain amino acids, meaning it has a chain branching off to one side of its molecular structure. Valine helps stimulate muscle growth and regeneration and is involved in energy production (5).

Threonine: Threonine is a principal part of structural proteins such as collagen and elastin, which are important components of the skin and connective tissue. It also plays a role in fat metabolism and immune function (6).

Tryptophan: Though often associated with causing drowsiness, tryptophan has many other functions. It’s needed to maintain proper nitrogen balance and is a precursor to serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates your appetite, sleep and mood (7).

Methionine: Methionine plays an important role in metabolism and detoxification. It’s also necessary for tissue growth and the absorption of zinc and selenium, minerals that are vital to your health (8).

Leucine: Like valine, leucine is a branched-chain amino acid that is critical for protein synthesis and muscle repair. It also helps regulate blood sugar levels, stimulates wound healing and produces growth hormones (9).

Isoleucine: The last of the three branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine is involved in muscle metabolism and is heavily concentrated in muscle tissue. It’s also important for immune function, hemoglobin production and energy regulation (10).

Lysine: Lysine plays major roles in protein synthesis, hormone and enzyme production and the absorption of calcium. It’s also important for energy production, immune function and the production of collagen and elastin (11).

Histidine: Histidine is used to produce histamine, a neurotransmitter that is vital to immune response, digestion, sexual function and sleep-wake cycles. It’s critical for maintaining the myelin sheath, a protective barrier that surrounds your nerve cells (12).

As you can see, essential amino acids are at the core of many vital processes.

Though amino acids are most recognized for their role in muscle development and repair, the body depends on them for so much more.

That’s why essential amino acid deficiencies can negatively impact your entire body including your nervous, reproductive, immune and digestive systems.

SUMMARY

All nine essential amino acids perform varied roles in your body. They’re involved in important processes such as tissue growth, energy production, immune function and nutrient absorption.


  • Previous:
  • Next:

  • Write your message here and send it to us

    related products